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American Hemerocallis Society
How to Register a Daylily

NOTE:

The following American Hemerocallis Society (AHS) Registration procedures, guidelines, rules, general information, and forms are valid as of January 1, 2011. There have been a number of changes to these guidelines due to the new International Code of Nomenclature for Cultivated Plants (ICNCP or Code) 2009 Rules for Nomenclature. Remember that unusual form daylilies must exhibit an unusual form characteristic on at least three segments of the flower. It should also be noted the ICNCP rules no longer forbid the use of the common names of other genera as the last word in a name. The rules listed below are a summary only, further ICNCP rules may apply.

Finally, it should be noted that the AHS Registration process recognizes that the genetics of the daylily continue to evolve and the registration form now accommodates the existence of sculpting characteristics in the "Forms" section. As sculpting has been noted on daylilies prior to this recognition it may be necessary for hybridizers to revise their registrations to record the existence of sculpting in existing cultivars. Thus, there will be no charge to hybridizers updating existing registrations to memorialize the sculpting characteristic. The "moratorium" period for these charges will last until November 1, 2012. This moratorium applies to hybridizer initiated changes related to sculpting only.


Online Registration is available HERE.


Quick Links:
AHS Registration Procedures | Fees | AHS Registration Guidelines
AHS Registration Rules |Legal and Miscellaneous Considerations
General Registration Information | Pre-Registration | Registration
Registration Revision
| Transfer or Change of Name | Reserved Name | Forms


AHS Non-Online Registration Procedures

1. Obtain an official AHS Registration Form by US mail or email from the AHS Registrar, or from the AHS Web Site as an Adobe Acrobat Portable Document Format (PDF) file. In order to view a PDF file, you must have Acrobat Reader which can be obtained free from Adobe® System's Web site. Use the blank forms as your "master" to make additional copies for your future use. This form must be used when submitting registrations to the Registrar.  The registrar reserves the right to reject any form that is no longer completely in accord with the ICNCP.

2. Complete the Registration Form and send to the Registrar along with a twenty dollar ($20.00) Registration Fee per daylily name. Payment should be in US funds payable to the American Hemerocallis Society. Forms will not be entered into the process until funds are received.

3. To be recorded in the current Check List, registrations must be postmarked no later than November 1. Any registrations postmarked after November 1 will be considered as the next year's registration.  Thus, if received after November 1, 2011, the publication will not be until the 2012 cultivars are published, which could be in early 2013.

4. A 35mm photographic color slide, color picture, or digital image is required with each application for registration of a daylily for descriptive and archival purposes at time of registration. While digital images are now preferred, a slide or, a color picture will be accepted. The following are the guidelines for the submission of the slide, color picture, or digital image:

  (a) If using a color slide or color picture, it is to be submitted with the Registration Form.
(b) If a digital image is used, it must be in a format acceptable and usable to the Registrar; the JPEG (.jpg) format is preferred.  Further, for ease of handling and processing a digital image size between 100K and 250K is preferred. Digital images should be renamed with the preferred cultivar name.
(c) For color slide and color picture users, the film type used must be recorded on the Registration Form.
(d) The color slide, color picture, or digital image must be properly labeled as to seedling number and cultivar name. Digital images should be named with the cultivar name and the seedling number included within the e-mail message to which the image is attached.
(e) The photograph of the flower must be taken in the garden with no digital manipulation permitted.
(f) Color and form should be true to cultivar in all respects and in sharp focus.
(g) The flower must fill but not encroach on the slide mount frame or image borders.

5. Those who wish to reserve a name may do so. The process of Name Reservation ($10.00 fee) has been retained at the direction of the AHS Board. Reserved Names have no attached seedling number or description and are protected for two (2) years. Reserve name periods may be extended by paying an additional $10.00 prior to the expiry of the existing reserve period.  Reserved names must not be used in gardens or in print.  The reserve period will run commencing with the date of reservation and expire two years from that reservation date, and NOT run concurrently to the conclusion (12/31) of the 2nd complete calendar year following reservation.

American Hemerocallis Society
c/o Kevin P. Walek, Registrar
for the ICRA for the Genus Hemerocallis
Kevin P. Walek, Registrar
102 Manahoac Ct.
Lake Frederick, VA 22630
540-252-2769 (home-office)

registrar@daylilies.org

Disclaimer: The Registrar is not responsible for recording or achiving any name not properly registered with the American Hemerocallis Society. The American Hemerocallis Society is not responsible for monitoring the commercial activity of any registered cultivar.

Fees

  Registration Fee
Reserved Name Fee
Registration Revision Fee
$20.00 Per Registration Application
$10.00/ 3 years
$10.00 Per Revision (at the discretion of the Registrar)

AHS Registration Guidelines

Please carefully and accurately complete your Registration Form. Information must be hand printed or typed. This will speed up the Registration Process and will create a better record for your cultivar.

Form AHS-R for Registration of a daylily cultivar requires:
  • Your signature and the date which you submit the form
  • Seedling Number (If they are not numbered see suggestions below)
  • Requested cultivar name
  • Height of the scape in inches
  • Season of bloom
  • Diameter of the flower in inches as naturally standing
  • A brief description of color and color pattern
  • A representative color slide, photograph or digital image
  • Fragrance habit
  • Blooming habit
  • Foliage habit
  • Ploidy
  • Flower form - state the form characteristic(s) exhibited by the flower.
  • Name and address and e-mail of originator.

Making sure these items are completed properly will save you time and give you a better registration. An explanation of all items on the forms is provided below. When these guidelines are carefully followed, your daylily descriptions in the Check List will be more meaningful. In the narrative below, which lists the information to be collected on the registration form, asterisks (*) are placed beside items for which completion is mandatory. These required items are denoted in the downloadable and online forms by bold-faced type and italicization.

* DATE

  Every document should be dated. Give a complete date: month, day, and year. using the U.S. convention of MM DD YY. The date should be the date the Registration Form is being prepared.

* SEEDLING NUMBER

  A seedling number is an arbitrary code to distinguish one seedling from all others. If you do not have an established system, use the first three letters of your family name followed by a series of digits or use other suitable combination of letters and digits. Examples: DOE00013, PI-R04, IMA97-3.

* NAME OF CULTIVAR

  Please print or type the name in order to avoid confusion and errors by the Registrar. The name must be an acceptable and available name, one that has not been used before, and one that will not likely be confused in spelling or pronunciation with a name that has already been registered. Please refer to the AHS Registration Rules. To speed the registration process, hybridizers are encouraged to offer an alternate name in case the first name is not allowed.

* HEIGHT OF SCAPE

  The height of scape should be given in inches as it grows in your garden. Place a yard stick at ground level and measure to the tip of the scape. Since there is apt to be variation in height between scapes, give the average in full inches; fractions of inches will be discarded.

BRANCHING AND BUD COUNT

  In order to have branching or bud count entered in the checklist, you must enter numbers in both categories.

AVERAGE NUMBER OF BRANCHES PER SCAPE

  Branching may vary from scape to scape on a single plant. Calculate the average number of branches per scape for your plant.

AVERAGE NUMBER OF BUDS PER SCAPE

  Bud count varies from scape to scape on a single plant. Calculate the average number of buds per scape for your plant.

* SEASON OF BLOOM

  Bloom season begins with the first cultivar to bloom, and ends when the last cultivar begins blooming. Bloom season is a bell curve, with the largest number of daylilies commencing bloom in the middle of the season. This is identified as MID-SEASON or PEAK BLOOM. Other bloom season dates approximate a time frame on either side of mid-season. Do not consider rebloom when determining bloom season. Calculate when peak bloom is in your area and determine how your seedling falls into the bloom sequence.

Use the following symbols:
EE - Extra Early.
A very few daylilies commence bloom earlier then 2-4 weeks before mid-season. These are Extra Early.
E - Early.
Daylilies that commence bloom 2-4 weeks before mid-season are considered Early.
EM - Early Midseason.
Daylilies that commence bloom 1-2 weeks before mid-season are Early-Mid.
M - Midseason.
Daylilies that commence bloom at "peak bloom" time are Mid.
ML - Late Midseason.
Daylilies that commence bloom 1-2 weeks after mid-season bloom are Mid-Late.
L - Late.
Daylilies that commence bloom 2-4 weeks after mid-season are considered Late.
VL - Very Late.
A very few daylilies commence bloom later than 2-4 weeks after mid-season. These are Very Late.

REBLOOM:

  Some daylily cultivars have more than one cycle of bloom during a single season. These are known as reblooming or recurrent daylilies. Some of these bloom early, have a rest period, and then rebloom. Others have a succession of bloom periods, one after another for several months. Cultivars which repeat in one location may not do so in another, as repeat bloom is often influenced by climate and weather conditions. Check the "yes" box only if your daylily reblooms in your garden.

* DIAMETER OF FLOWER IN INCHES AS NATURALLY STANDING

  Imagine a wire circle that is just large enough for the average or typical sized flower to pass through without touching. The diameter of the circle in inches will be the diameter of the flower. If you prefer, use a ruler and measure from tip to tip at the widest point and this will be the diameter. The main thing to remember is to measure as naturally standing - do not uncurl recurved flowers for the measurement. The second thing to remember in recording this measurement is that a flower will be classed as miniature (i.e., less than 3 inches), small (3 inches to 4-1/2 inches), large (4-1/2 inches or more), and extra-large (7" and greater) according to the registered diameter. For instructions on measuring Spider daylilies, see the discussion under "FORM". Increments less than 1/8 inch may be rounded, except where it would cause confusion for show classification.

* COLOR

 

There are a number of color patterns in daylily flowers:

Self.
The petals and sepals are all the same shade of the same color. The color of the stamens or of the throat may be different.
Blend.
The flower segments are a blend of two colors; i.e., pink and rose. Petals and sepals are the same blend of colors; stamens and throat may be a different color.
Polychrome.
The color is an intermingling of many colors, i.e., melon, pink, lavender, yellow; stamens and throat may be a different color.
Bitone.
The petals and sepals are the same color, but differ in shade or intensity. In a Bitone, the petals are a darker shade than the sepals, i.e., rose pink while the sepals are pale pink. A Reverse Bitone has petals which are a lighter shade than the sepals.
Bicolor.
The petals and sepals are of a totally different color, i.e., red and yellow with the sepals being lighter in shade or color value. In a Reverse Bicolor, the sepals are the darker color and the petals are lighter.
Eyezone.
A distinguishing pattern on many daylilies is a band of color circling the throat that differs from the petals and sepals. This area is called the "eyezone."
Band: A darker shade occurs on the petals but not the sepals.
Eye: A darker shade appears on both petals and sepals
Halo: A band of color appears on petals and/or sepals, but is faint or only lightly visible
Watermark: An area of a lighter shade shade than the petal in the area above the throat
Edged or Picoteed.
A daylily is said to have an edge or picotee if it has a contrasting color on the segment edges. The color may match or differ from the eye, if there is one.

Circle or underline each word (band, halo, watermark, eye, or edge) that applies to your cultivar and give the color to the right in the space provided. Describe any other color characteristics (e.g., midrib, dotted, dusted) as necessary.

Color in Mass, Petal Color, Sepal Color, and Throat Color. Briefly give the color of the flower mass from the clump, the color of the petals, and the color of the sepals. Daylilies may have a contrasting or complementing throat color. Also give the color of the throat in the space provided.

FRAGRANCE

  The flower either has no fragrance (none), is fragrant (fr.), or very fragrant (v.fr.). Circle the word or abbreviation which applies to the cultivar being registered.

* BLOOMING HABIT

 

There are three terms most commonly used to describe the bloom habits found in daylilies. Circle the abbreviation which best applies to your cultivar.

Diurnal (diu.)
These are daylilies which bloom during daylight hours only.

Nocturnal (noc.)
These are daylilies which open in the late afternoon or early evening and remain open all night and close the following day.

Extended (ext.)
These are daylilies which remain open at least 16 hours. There are extended bloomers in both diurnal and nocturnal daylilies.

* FOLIAGE HABIT

 

Circle the abbreviation which best applies to your cultivar. Daylilies have three types of growth.

Evergreen (ev.)
These daylilies retain their foliage throughout the year. In the north, these plants over winter as a mound of frozen pale green foliage. Evergreens may resume growth during a mid-winter thaw in mild climates.
Semi-evergreen (sev.)
The foliage of these daylilies dies back nearly to the ground in very cold climates. Some green will be seen near the base. Generally, semi-evergreens wait until spring to resume growth.
Dormant (dor.)
These daylilies lose their foliage completely before or shortly after frost and over winter with pointed foliage buds, usually just beneath the soil surface. Dormants will resume growth in spring.

PARENTAGE

 

This is not required information, but is important to the breeder and to many growers and its inclusion is strongly encouraged. Space is provided for the pod and pollen parents. For AHS Check List consistency, the pod (i.e., female) parent is listed first, followed by a multiplication sign, (which means pollinated by), followed by the pollen (i.e., male) parent.

One Generation Example: (Shockwave × Sunny Magic)
Multi-Generation Example: ((Chateau Blanc × Pale Blush) × sdlg)
Multi-Generation Example: (Pale Blush × (Kali × (sdlg × Polly Mayo)))
 

NOTE: Only Registered names may be used. The word "Seedling" will be used for all non-registered names.

PLOIDY

  Diploids have two identical sets of chromosomes in each cell. Tetraploids have four identical sets of chromosomes in each cell. Generally, diploids will only cross with diploids, and tetraploids will only cross with tetraploids. A box is provided for you to indicate which term applies to your cultivar.

*FLOWER FORM

 

SINGLE
Most daylily flowers have six segments in two whorls, consisting of three petals and three sepals, and are known as single flowers.

DOUBLE
These are daylilies with more than six segments. Doubles appear in two forms. Extra segments may appear in the center of the flower, giving a peony effect, or may appear layered, as one complete flower inside another. The number of extra segments may vary between cultivars and individual flowers. Some cultivars may double only some of the time. Space is provided to record the percentage of double bloom in the hybridizer's garden.

POLYMEROUS
A polymerous daylily has more than the normal three sepals in the outer whorl of the flower and a matching number of petals in the inner whorl. The number of anthers will match the combined number of petals and sepals, but there will be only one pistil. There is no defined number of segments for a polymerous bloom. Most cultivars do not form polymerous blooms all the time. Space is provided to record the percentage of polymerous bloom in the hybridizer's garden.

SPIDER
On a Spider, the petals and sepals are much longer in proportion to their width than a normal flower. A SPIDER is a daylily whose petal length to width ratio is at least 4.0:1. A box is provided for you to indicate if the cultivar is a SPIDER with space to record petal width and length in inches.

Measuring a Spider daylily: For width, measure the longest petal at its widest point as naturally standing (without uncurling, unfolding, or flattening any portion of the petal). For length, stretch out the petal to its fullest and measure the length of the longest petal from its tip to the v-shaped notch formed where the adjacent sepals separate at the neck of the flower. The result of dividing the length by the width is expressed in the form of a ratio (e.g., 5.6:1 which is read "five point six to one").

UNUSUAL FORM
The registration class designated as Unusual Form, includes crispate (pinched, twisted, or quilled floral segments); cascading (narrow curling or cascading segments); and spatulate (segments markedly wider at the end like a kitchen spatula). The Unusual Form class is based exclusively on form not on color or color patterns. An Unusual Form must display Unusual Form characteristics on at least 3 petals or 3 sepals.

UF Definition Graphic

 

The original purpose of this class was to recognize unusual forms whose length-to-width ratio put them outside the Spider classifications. Subsequently, it was determined that some cultivars could exhibit both spider and unusual form characteristics and thus in order to have a complete and accurate description of a cultivar for registration purposes a cultivar may be registered as exhibiting both characteristics.

SCULPTED

 

A Sculpted Form daylily has three-dimensional structural features involving or emanating from the throat, midrib or elsewhere on the petal surface. Sculpted forms belong to one of three different groups: Pleated, Cristated or Relief.

PLEATED:
In the pleated group, petals have a deep longitudinal crease on each side of the midrib. These creases cause folding of the petal upon itself creating a raised platform extending from the top of the perianth tube and ending between the throat and the petal tip.

CRISTATE:
This category refers to flowers having appendages of extra petal tissue growing from the midrib or elsewhere on the surface of the petals. When the extra tissue grows from the midribs, the form is called a "Midrib Cristate". (Other Cristate forms have been referred to as "gothic" in The Daylily Journal.) The Cristate Form, referred to by many as "Cresting" can occur on single and double daylilies, and thus does not, in itself, constitute a double daylily.

RELIEF:
Daylilies falling into this category are characterized by vertically raised ridges that extend from the throat and project from the petal surface. The ridges may grow parallel to the veins, or they may radiate outwards from each side of the midrib.

For examples of these forms, please check the SCULPTED entry in the AHS Daylily Dictionary.

* ORIGINATOR

  The complete name and address of the originator must be given. The originator has been determined by the Board of Directors to be the person who has ownership of the entire cultivar when it blooms for the first time.

* NAME AND ADDRESS OF REGISTRANT

  This space is used only when a person other than the originator applies for the registration of the plant. In this case, the Registrant must have the written permission of the originator before the plant can be registered (see Permission Statements).

* PERMISSION STATEMENTS

 

Space is provided on the bottom portion of the Registration Form to record the written permission of the originator (if different from the Registrant). If the originator is deceased, write "Deceased."

Space is also provided on the bottom portion of the Registration Form to record the written permission obtained from a person whose name you wish to use as a name of a cultivar. If the person is living and is not a member of your immediate family, you must have written permission before the name can be used as a name for a daylily. Immediate family has been defined for this purpose as Grandparents, Parents, Brothers, Sisters, Children, and Grandchildren. If the person is deceased, write "Deceased."

Any member who proposes to name a daylily after a person who is deceased, is required to make every effort to gain permission from the estate of the deceased person. Any member who uses the name of a deceased person shall assume all legal responsibility for the use of the deceased person's name. Further, it is understood that any member who names a daylily by using the name of a deceased person herewith agrees, by signing this document, to indemnify and hold the American Hemerocallis Society harmless from any and all claims regarding such conduct, including payment of court costs, expenses and reasonable attorney's fees.


AHS Registration Rules
AHS publishes new daylily cultivar names each year in a Check List or Check List Supplement. Annually, there is a November 1 cut-off for registrations to allow time for names to be checked and the material prepared for publication with the current year's date. Thus, cultivars registered after November will be processed with the subsequent year's date, i.e., information received from 11/1/2009 through 10/31/2010 will be published in the Spring of 2011 as 2010 Registrations.

1. These rules are effective January 1, 2011, and supersede all previous versions.

2. Unless stated otherwise in the following rules, names of daylilies shall follow the International Code of Nomenclature for Cultivated Plants – Eighth Edition ("ICNCP": October 2009; Scripta Horticulturae, Number 10).

3. A seedling name must be chosen that has not previously been used for a daylily cultivar. The name must be in any recognized language (except Latin, see Item 4 below), but must be accompanied by an accurate translation to English to facilitate checking that it meets the AHS rules for registration. Personal names should not be translated. Names in a non-English alphabet should be transcribed into English letters.

4. A seedling name may not be reserved, or registered in Latin, the language reserved for botanical names. Latin words or words in Latin form may be used in new cultivar names only when it can be demonstrated that they are currently used in a language other than Latin as terms, common phrases, personal names, and place names. (ICNCP 2009, Article 21.12)

Example: 'Corpus Christi', 'Habeas Corpus', and 'Non Sequitur' are Latin phrases common in the English language that may be used.

6. Cultivar names are written by enclosing the name within single quotation marks.  Double quotation marks are not to be used in a cultivar name. (ICNCP 2009, Article 14.1)

7. Each word of a cultivar name must start with an initial capital letter unless linguistic custom demands otherwise.  Exceptions are after a hyphen (See Article 35.11 and 35.12) unless they are proper nouns, conjunctions, articles and prepositions other than those in the first word of the name. (ICNCP 2009, Article 21.3)

Example: 'Jewel of the Nile'

8. A registered name may have no more than thirty (30) characters, including letters, numbers and permitted punctuation marks (excluding spaces). (ICNCP 2009, Article 21.13) A cultivar name may not be established if its name consists solely of a single letter or solely of Arabic or Roman numerals or a single letter or numerals in combination with a punctuation mark. (ICNCP 2009, Article 21.15)

Example 1: 'K', 'MMIV' and '400' cannot be allowed.
Example 2: '10 Downing Street', 'Happy 21st Birthday', 'Henry VIII', and '4th of July' may be used.


9. A cultivar name may not use 'Hemerocallis' or 'Daylily' anywhere in the name. Like sounding words may not be used. (ICNCP 2009, Article 21.20)

Example 1: 'Howling Hemerocallis' would not be allowed.
Example 2: 'Daylily -Dreams' would be not allowed.
Example 3: 'Darling Daylilli' would not be allowed


10. The legal or professional name of a living person (other than your immediate family) cannot be used without written permission from that person. (ICNCP 2009, Article 21E.1)

11. Names may not be so similar to an existing name that they might be confusing (ICNCP-2009, Article 21.23):

A. Names likely to be confused in spelling or pronunciation with existing names may not be used (ICNCP-2009, Article 21.23): 

Example 1: 'Susannah' and 'Susanna'.  However, 'Susanne' might not be considered confusing if the pronunciation is distinctly different.
Example 2: 'Green Point' and Greenpoint'.


B. Although abbreviations are allowed, an abbreviation may not create a different name.

Example 1: If 'Mount Kisco' exists, 'Mt Kisco' is not allowed; conversely, if 'Mt Kisco' exists, 'Mount Kisco' is not allowed.  (For proper use of the full stop [period: "."] in a cultivar name see Item 18 below.)
Example 2: 'Mister John Doe' is identical to 'Mr.  John Doe', but neither is allowed if 'John Doe'' has already been registered.

NOTE: Because of possible name confusion, abbreviations are not recommended; words should be spelled out where possible.  However, see Rule 18 herein for proper construction.

C. Although names containing initial articles are allowed, such an article may not create a different name. AHS Policy derived from ICNCP-2009, Article 21.23.

Example 1: If 'Sunshine Park' exists, 'A Sunshine Park' is not allowed; conversely, if 'A Sunshine Park' exists, 'Sunshine Park' is not allowed.
Example 2. If 'Colonel' exists, 'The Colonel' is not allowed; conversely, if 'The Colonel' exists, 'Colonel' is not allowed.

D. Names created by slight modifications of existing names may not be used.

Example 1: 'Prom Date' and 'Prom Dates'.
Example 2: 'Fire Storm' and 'Fiery Storm'.
Example 3: 'Gold Desert' and 'Gold Dessert'. However, 'Gobi Desert' would be allowed.


E. Names made by changing spelling of an existing name may not be used. [ AHS Policy derived from ICNCP-2009, Article 21.23.]

Example: 'Daylight' and 'Daylite'.

F. Deliberate misspelling of a previously pre-registered or registered name to achieve a new name is not allowed. However, unusual spellings may be allowed if the spelling does not cause confusion.

Example: If 'Ruffled Rabbit' has not been used, 'Wuffled Wabbit' may be allowed.

G. Umlauts and other diacritical marks do not constitute new letters to make a different name.

Example 1: If 'Schon Fraulein' exists, 'Schön Fräulein' (spelled with umlauts) is not allowed.
Example 2: If 'Rose Wine' exists 'Rosé (spelled with an accent) Wine' is not allowed.


H. Possessive pronouns (My, Your, His, Her, Our, and Their) may not be used as a one word prefix to an existing cultivar to create a different name. The same applies to Whose, It's, and other similar terms. AHS Policy derived from ICNCP-2009 Article 21.23. (See more detailed discussion regarding the proliferation of possessives, etc., in Number 23 below).

Example 1: 'Our Spring Fling' would not be allowed ('Spring Fling'; 1988)
Example 2: 'Whose Rococo!' would not be allowed ('Rococo'; 1972)


12. The names of cultivars that have won the AHS Stout Medal may not be used with any one word prefix or suffix to create a new name subsequent to the cultivar having won the award.

Example 1: 'Satin Glass', 1968 Stout Medal Winner. 'Satin Glass Slipper', 'Red Satin Glass', and 'Starlight Satin Glass' are not allowed.
Example 2: 'Playboy', 1961 Stout Medal Winner. 'Playboy's Red Corvette', 'Little Playboy's Bride', and 'Starlight Playboy Racer' are not allowed


13. Permitted punctuation marks are the apostrophe ('), the comma (,), up to two non-adjacent exclamation marks (!),  the period (.) the hyphen (-), the forward slash (/) and the backward slash (\). (ICNCP 2009 21.18) Fractions and symbols are not allowed. (ICNCP 2009 Article 21.19). 

Example 1: 'Oh Boy!', 'Jeanne D'Arc', and 'Silly-willy' are allowed.
Example 2: 'Help!!!!' and 'Simon Who?' are not.
Example 3: 'Half and Half', and 'Two Plus Two' would be allowed.
Example 4: 'Happy@Home', 'Million$', '100%', and '_ empty' would not be allowed.


14. Names exaggerating the merits of a cultivar or which may become inaccurate through the introduction of new cultivars or other circumstances are not allowed. (ICNCP-2009, Articles 21.24).

Example 1: 'Earliest of All' is not allowed.
Example 2: 'Most Ruffled' is not allowed.
Example 3: 'Largest Ever' is not allowed.


15. Because of their botanical meaning, or other potential for exaggeration, or confusion, the code specifically prohibits names containing the following words (or their equivalents or plural forms in any language): "cultivar", "grex", "group", "hybrid", "maintenance", "mixture", "selection", "series", "improved", and "transformed". (ICNCP-2009, Article 21.17).

Example 1: 'Improved Performer' is not allowed.
Example 2: 'Transformed Velvet Border' is not allowed.


16. Names may not consist solely of a common descriptive word or words (i.e., adjectival) that could refer to some attribute common or likely to be common in a group of related cultivars. (ICNCP 2009, Article 21G)  Likewise, a cultivar name should not be published if its epithet might cause confusion by consisting of terms that are likely to be encountered in the market place. (ICNCP 2009, Article 21F)

Example 1: 'Double Red', 'Large White', and 'Fringed ', 'Northern Rebloomer' would not be allowed.
Example 2: 'Ten Dollars', 'Tax Free', and 'Poisonous' would not be allowed.
Example 3: 'Double Red Whopper' and 'Tax Free Living', would be allowed.


17. A cultivar name should not be published if it may give the impression that the cultivar has one or more attributes that it does not possess. (ICNCP 2009, Article 21H)

Example 1: 'Crystalline Yellow' should not be used if the flower is not yellow.
Example 2: 'She Lob Spider' should not be used if the flower does not have spider characteristics.


18. A cultivar name should not be published if its epithet may give the impression that the cultivar is derived from or related to another when this is not the case. (ICNCP 2009, Article 21I) Likewise, a cultivar name should not be published if its epithet may give a false impression concerning the identity of its raiser, breeder, introducer or origin ICNCP 2009, Article 21J)

Example 1: 'Ruby Spider Baby' would not be allowed unless 'Ruby Spider' is one of the parents.
Example 2: 'Siloam Kitten Whiskers' would not be allowed unless it was hybridized by Pauline Henry.


19. A cultivar name should be as short as practical and should not consist of nor contain excessively long words that may be difficult to write or pronounce (ICNCP 2009, Article 21D.1)

20. A cultivar name should not be published if its epithet might cause offence. (ICNCP 2009, Article 21K)

21.  For purposes of consistency, when a cultivar name contains a word that is an abbreviation, the period (full-stop is added after the abbreviation unless that abbreviation is an acronym) a pronounceable word derived from the initial letters of a name comprised of two or more words, an initialism (a word derived from initial letters of a name each one of which is spoken individually), a blend (a novel word derived from combining parts of other words) or a contraction of a word in which cases the period should not be applied. (ICNCP 2009, Article 35.9)

Example 1:  In English the word "Professor" when abbreviated  is written Prof., whereas the words "Doctor", "Mister", "Mountain", and "Saint" when abbreviated are written Dr, Mr, Mt,  and St respectively , their abbreviations being contractions.
Example 2: 'G.K. Chesterton'; 'Mrs M.L. Bland'; 'MCC' (an initialism representing Marylebone Cricket Club, and NOT a Roman Numeral  (See Item 5, Example 1 above);  'USS Enterprise', an initialism; and, 'Pride of NASA', an acronym are both acceptable.


22. Unless linguistic custom demands otherwise, the second and subsequent elements of a hyphenated word are to start with a lower case letter. (ICNCP 2009, Articles 11.1, et.seq.; Article 35.12)

Example 1: 'Blue-Eyed', 'Choo-Choo' and 'Show-Off' would not be allowed.
Example 2: 'Blue-eyed' 'Choo-choo' and 'Show-off', would be allowed. Further where grammatically acceptable to drop the hyphen 'Choo Choo' would be acceptable.
(See also Article 35.11)


23. As noted in Number 24, acceptance of all names is subject to review by the Registration Committee.  The Committee wishes to clarify that there has been a proliferation of the use of specific garden related prefixes,  such as "Siloam," attached to existing cultivar names; repetition of the one word in a one word cultivar name to create as new name , i.e. 'Candy Candy'; and, the use of possessives in front of existing cultivar names (see also 11H above.) Such usage will be reviewed carefully and rejections may occur where the use appears related only to the marketability of the name, rather than the relationship to a specific reason for the reuse of the base name.  Thus, simply placing an prefix garden name will no longer be accepted on its face vlaue. Rather an analysis will be done to ascertain that there is a purpose other than using a name that has garnered favor.

Further, regarding Committee review of possessives it should be noted that the Committee will use, in part, the following, 3 part, test:

1)   Where the possessive is placed before a word or series of words that constitute an existing cultivar name but the "thing" being possessed is broadly defined such as laughter we could have several people whose laughter is distinctly theirs and unrelated to a characteristic of the flower.  Thus, 'Kevin's Laughter' would be acceptable.

2)   Where the possessive is placed before a word or series of words that constitute an existing cultivar name but the "thing" being possessed is related to a flower characteristic, the use will be rejected. Thus, 'Kevin's Rebloomer' would be rejected for at least two reasons.  Similarly 'Kevin's Humdinger' may be rejected as it could be construed to apply to the size or quality of the flower itself.

3)   Where the possessive is placed before a word or series of words that DO NOT constitute an existing cultivar name and the "thing" being "possessed" would not otherwise result in rejection, the possessive is not an issue and the name would be accepted. 

24. Acceptance of all names is subject to review by the Registration Committee. Judgment shall be based on majority opinion as to the general acceptance of the name. Names should be double checked for correct spelling; misspelled words may not be accepted. Any name submitted to the Registrar and rejected may be first appealed to the full Committee. Reasons for the appeal should be submitted at the time of appeal. Review shall be based on interpretation of the rule and not the rule itself. The AHS Executive Committee is the Registration Board of Appeals with final approval or denial regarding suitability of names submitted for registration (AHS Board decision, May 1997).  The decision of the Executive Committee is subject to appeal to the International Union of Biological Sciences International Commission for the Nomenclature of Cultivated Plants.   (ICNCP 2009, Articles 11.1, et.seq.;  Article 19.1)

25. A 35mm photographic color slide, color picture, or digital image is required from each registrant for each daylily being registered for descriptive and archival purposes at time of registration. While a digital image is now preferred, a slide or a color picture will be accepted. The following are the guidelines for the submission of the slide, color picture, or digital image:

  (a) If using a color slide or color picture, it is to be submitted with the Registration Form.
(b) If a digital image is used, it must be in a format acceptable and usable to the Registrar; the JPEG (.jpg) format is preferred.  Further, for ease of handling and processing a digital image size between 100K and 250K is preferred. Digital images should be renamed with the preferred cultivar name.
(c) For color slide and color picture users, the film type used must be recorded on the Registration Form.
(d) The color slide, color picture, or digital image must be properly labeled as to seedling number and cultivar name. Digital images should be named with the cultivar name and the seedling number included within the e-mail message to which the image is attached.
(e) The photograph of the flower must be taken in the garden with no digital manipulation permitted.
(f) Color and form should be true to cultivar in all respects and in sharp focus.
(g) The flower must fill but not encroach on the slide mount frame or image borders.

 



Legal and Miscellaneous Considerations

The right to use any proposed cultivar name may also be subject to copyright and/or trademark rights held by third persons. While the registrar may reject any proposed cultivar name on the grounds that the proposed cultivar name may possibly violate copyright and/or trademark rights held by third persons, the acceptance of a proposed cultivar name by the registrar does not constitute a determination that such copyright and/or trademark rights of third persons have not been violated and the undersigned hereby agrees, by signing this document, to indemnify and hold the American Hemerocallis Society, its Regions, employees, officers, directors and its successors and assigns harmless from any and all claims of copyright and/or trademark infringement, including payment of court costs, expenses and reasonable attorney's fees.

Further, the registrant acknowledges that by submitting a photograph of the cultivar being registered as required by the registration rules of the American Hemerocallis Society as registrar of the genus Hemerocallis, or for use in the online cultivar database maintained by the American Hemerocallis Society, that the undersigned hereby grants the American Hemerocallis Society and its Regions the right to reprint or republish such photograph in the online database maintained by the American Hemerocallis Society; in any of the newsletters or journals published by the American Hemerocallis Society or any of its Regions; to publish such photograph on any website maintained by or on behalf of the American Hemerocallis Society or any of its Regions; and to publish such photograph in any other publication published by the American Hemerocallis Society or its Regions in the ordinary course of its educational and scientific activities. The undersigned represents and warrants that he is the owner of all copyright rights with respect to the article and/or photograph submitted to the American Hemerocallis Society other than those rights otherwise granted to the American Hemerocallis Society herein or by law. The undersigned shall retain ownership of all individual copyright rights in the photograph covered by this agreement except for those rights granted to the American Hemerocallis Society herein or by law. The term "photograph," as used herein, shall mean any and all still photography in any format, as well as videotape, video disc any other mechanical means of recording and reproducing images.

The undersigned has entered into this agreement in order to assist educational, scientific, and charitable goals and hereby waives any right to compensation for such uses by reason of the foregoing authorizations, and the undersigned and his successors or assigns hereby hold the American Hemerocallis Society its Regions, employees, officers, directors and its successors and assigns harmless from and against any claim for injury or compensation resulting from the activities authorized by this agreement.

Once registered, a daylily cultivar name may not be changed or transferred unless to correct orthographic errors by the person submitting the application or by the registrar or their designees.  (AHS Board decision, May 1997).

Please be advised that from time to time computer and human errors may occur. The Registration Committee reserves the right to review all pre-registered and registered names prior to publication of the yearly Check List. Should an error be found which would be in conflict with the above rules, the hybridizer would be informed and asked to make a name change prior to publication.

It is the responsibility of the hybridizer - not the AHS Registrar, the AHS Registration Committee, or the AHS - to check for cultivar names which might conflict with trade names, trademarks, service names, and patented names.


General Registration Information

The naming of cultivated plants is controlled in order to provide a functional worldwide system. All taxonomic matters in plants fall under the purview of the International Union of Biological Sciences (IUBS). As cultivated plants, daylilies come under the broad umbrella of the International Society for Horticultural Science (ISHS), which is subsidiary to the IUBS. In 1955, the ISHS appointed the American Hemerocallis Society (AHS) as the International Cultivar Registration Authority (ICRA) for Hemerocallis.

Also operating in parallel fashion with ISHS under the IUBS are two other groups, the General Committee on Biological Nomenclature and the International Code of Nomenclature for Cultivated Plants (ICNCP). It is the responsibility of the ICNCP to provide broad overall requirements for the naming of cultivated plants, to ensure worldwide uniformity. In 2009, the ICNCP published a new edition of the code, the International Code of Nomenclature for Cultivated Plants (ICNCP-2009). In May 2009, the AHS Board approved use of ICNCP-2009 for registering daylilies.

The ICNCP-2009 sets out certain parameters for the acceptance of cultivar names for distinctive cultivated plants (cultivars). A very important requirement in this acceptance is the publication of new names. As the International Registration Authority for daylilies, AHS ensures that a name is available and publishes the new names each year in a Check List or Check List Supplement. Annually, there is a November 1 cut-off date for registrations to allow time for the name to be checked and the material published with the current year's date. The Registrar is extremely busy at that time of year. Every cultivar which has been registered from December 1st of the previous year is in the AHS computer, ready to be published at year end.


Pre-Registration

The Pre-Registration was eliminated by the AHS Board effective October 31, 2002. See "Reserved Name" below.


Registration

Registration is accomplished by submitting a Registration Form with a $20.00 fee per full registration application and the inclusion of the required photo. Once registered, the cultivar may be placed in commerce immediately. Caution: That notwithstanding, under the ICNCP a registration is not official until published and thus the registrar reserves the right to make changes or reject a name that has received initial approval until publication in the checklist. No "Introduction Form" is required and there is no longer a requirement for the submission of catalogs or flyers. AHS review of introduction has been eliminated.  That notwithstanding, under the ICNCP a registration is not official until published and thus the registrar reserves the right to make changes or reject a name that has received initial approval until publication in the checklist.


Registration Revision
Once registered, any changes resulting from hybridizer error, or misfiling may be made by submitting a newly-completed Registration Form with a $10.00 fee per Form. See "Transfer or Change of Name" discussion below. Corrections made due to errors made by the registrar will NOT incur a charge.


Transfer or Change of Name

Once registered, a daylily cultivar name may not be changed or transferred (AHS Board decision, May 1997) unless to correct orthographic errors by the person submitting the application or by the registrar or their designees. 


Reserved Name

Those who wish to reserve a name can do so. The process of Name Reservation ($10.00 fee) has been retained at the direction of the AHS Board. Reserved Names have no attached seedling number or description and are protected for two (3) years. Reservations may be extended by paying the $10.00 fee prior to the end of the existing reservation period.  Reserved Names must not be used in gardens or in print.

Forms

Guidelines and Rules in pdf format

AHS Cultivar Registration Form in pdf format.


© Copyright 2010-2012 by the American Hemerocallis Society, Inc.
 
 
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